Tag Archives: criminal defense investigator

Invisible Wall – Correction – A strong Social Barrier

The topic of a wall is on everyone’s mind right now. Regardless of anything the President and Congress build, make no mistake—we already have a wall. The wall I’m thinking of is a societal wall, and it’s massive yet invisible. This wall is a strong social barrier. It cannot be climbed, penetrated or tunneled under.

Criminal Investigations

I bump up against this wall, too.  As a court-appointed Private investigator for criminal defendants, I see a part of society that most never will. I work for the sick, tired, poor and uneducated. Most of my clients came from unimaginable squalor, and continue to live in poverty and hopelessness that’s hard to grasp.  I see how their children suffer from the sins of their mothers and fathers. Make no mistake. The people I represent are considered a menace to society. They are desperate but gave up have stopped looking for jobs long ago. They hit the invisible wall, time and time again. At some point, their lives took a turn. I ask myself what keeps them there?

Long ago, I came up with a prayer, a mantra of sorts to help me stay focused. “Help me help myself so that I may help others.”

There is loud clamor to the south of our boarders. It extends deep into the lives of the people I’m hired to assist in criminal cases. As I peel back the layers of the lives of my clients, all I see is chaos. Eventually, though, most of the children and adults will be forced into crimes, gangs, prostitution and mental conditions. They have no hope in their native countries! But what about here, in the greatest nation? Should they have hope here?

Migrants, be they immigrants or refugees, want for a better life.  Some say we are a country of immigrants and that we have a special duty to those new residents. Others say no. That’s this bigger invisible wall I’m talking about.

Here is the question I ask often: Do we have an obligation to provide them with a place in America and give them opportunity to participate in the dream?

I figured that they want a better life and deserve a chance. That could, and should happen before they meet me. These are lost and forgotten residents.  Hidden, perhaps, behind the invisible wall.

Why don’t we do something? 

The courts and commissioners know who’s here, yet nothing is done. Their priorities are elsewhere, could be south, or making sanctuary cities helping immigrants.

That leaves us.  We must do, individually, what we can.

As they have for generations, I hope the legal migrants continue coming to American for a better life.  Also, I hope that we can help our forgotten citizens meaningfully participate in our society.